Excerpt from
The Jensen Family

Probably he got caught in a steel trap like this one over here," their dad said, pointing to an exhibit in the next case.
"But how could he get free from that?" Julie asked.

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– posted 12.04.2009

Hudson Taylor- Part 6

A Character story about compassion.

How happy Hudson and Maria Taylor were, serving the Lord together among the Chinese people in Ningpo. But there was little time for sitting and dreaming. They were busy in preaching and medical work every day. In the summer of 1859 two things happened to change their lives. On July 31st, a daughter was born, whom they named Grace. What joy she brought to their
lives!
But the next month tragedy hit. Dr. Parker, their dear friend and co-worker, had been taking care of the hospital in Ningpo. But on August 26th, his wife was stricken with a dangerous sickness and died at midnight, leaving 4 small children. Dr. Parker took this hard. He had neither heart nor strength for the burdens and decided to take his family home to the care of relatives in Scotland.
We are told in II Corinthians 8:12, "If there be first a willing mind, it is accepted..." Hudson Taylor had such a mind. He was willing to do what he could to share the good news of salvation with the Chinese people every way he could. Thus, within 8 days after Dr. Parker left, Hudson Taylor became responsible for the entire hospital, which included giving medicine, doctoring the 51 patients, administrating the staff, and sharing the good news of salvation with each one. He determined of course, that the hospital would not run in debt. But when he told the staff that they had no guaranteed income but would all live by faith, some quit. Still, Hudson and Maria determined to follow God's ways.
Maria not only took care of little Grace, but also helped at the hospital with account-keeping, writing letters, and all household cares. She even found time to help much with the women patients. Affairs at the hospital were not secret, especially their venture in faith, trusting only in God to supply their needs. When the final bag of rice was opened, and no money was in hand,
Hudson Taylor said, "Then the Lord's time for helping us must be close at hand." Indeed it was, for before that bag was finished, he received a letter containing $250 from a friend in England. More would be sent in the days to come! What a praise meeting the staff had when this news was shared! But the heavy load of work paid a toll on Mr. Taylor. By the summer of 1860 tuberculosis forced him to return to England or die. During the 4 month voyage, he and Maria planned what they could do to meet the needs in China while in England. Though he didn't know if they would ever return, Hudson knew he could still serve by improving the Chinese translation of the New Testament and writing a hymn book. Typically he worked on these projects for 9 or 10 hours each day, in addition to seeing visitors and writing letters.
ˇBut his ill health dragged on as months turned into years, and the weight of the work pressed on him heavier every day. He later wrote, "a million a month were dying in that land, dying without God. This was burned into my very soul. For two or three months the conflict was intense. I scarcely slept night or day more than an hour at a time, and feared I should lose my reason.. [My wife] saw, doubtless, that something was going on; but I felt I must refrain as long as possible from laying upon her a burden so crushing- these souls, and what eternity must mean for every one of them, and what the Gospel might do, would do, for all who believed, if we would take it to them." He thought of a conversation with Mr. Ni, a Chinese Christian a few years earlier. "How long have you had the Glad Tidings in your country?" he had asked Mr. Taylor.
ˇ"Some hundreds of years," was his reluctant reply.
ˇ"What! Hundreds of years? My father sought the Truth, and died without finding it. Oh, why did you not come sooner?"
ˇHudson wanted so to reach these millions in inland China. But how could he ask others to go to China and sacrifice as he and Maria had joyfully done? How could he ask them to risk their lives in dangerous places to take the Gospel to people who had never heard?
ˇHe also thought of the indifference of so many. His mind went back to a tragic event that took place while he was sailing from Shanghai to Ningpo. One passenger on the boat, Peter by name, had spent some time in England. Peter knew about Jesus but had not accepted Him as his person Saviour. As they neared the shore, Mr. Taylor went to his cabin to gather his belongings. Suddenly he heard a "splash!". Hudson flew to the deck to find Peter missing.
"Yes, he fell overboard and went down," a man said indifferently. Hudson could hardly believe the little care he showed. The missionary scanned the water and then saw some fishermen with nets.
"Come, and drag over this spot. A man is drowning!" He yelled.
"It's not convenient," they called back. "We are busy fishing."
"Never mind your fishing. Come at once. I will pay you well."
"How much will you give us?" the fishermen asked.
"Five dollars, but hurry!"
"Too little," they replied. "We will not come for less than 30." "But I don't have that much. I have but $14 with me." At this the fishermen talked over the offer and finally agreed to fish the man out. But when he was dumped on deck, it was too late. Peter had died because those who could help didn't care.
Finally, on June 25th, 1865, Hudson Taylor surrendered to the will of God for him. He agreed to begin a new mission whose goal was to reach the 24 provinces of inland China. He agreed to pray for 24 workers to go to these provinces. Their desire, call, safety, and provision he would lay into the hands of the Lord. On June 27th, the first $50 was deposited in the bank count of the ˇChina Inland Missionˇ.